It’s almost the end of our 31 Days in the Kitchen, and I’m having a hard time narrowing down post topics: there is so much more I wanted to squeeze into this month!  I still haven’t touched on cocktails, I’ve barely grazed my favorite desserts with a (completely unplanned) emergency pie, and I wanted to talk about pantry basics and keeping a well stocked kitchen and make you a Holiday 2014 Gift List for the foodies in your life.  We may be running out of out of days in October, but I don’t think we’ve reached the end of talking about cooking and eating here at Pink-Briefcase.

Today, let’s talk about my favorite way to rejuvenate leftovers: the frittata.

A frittata is like a quiche without a crust.  You cook it in a skillet instead of a pie plate, and you begin cooking on the stove top and transfer into the oven to finish.  The edges and the entire bottom of the frittata get brown and crispy.  (I think that real Italians flip their frittatas so that both the top and the bottom get brown and crispy, but I do not have those skills and I am comfortable with that.)

My favorite frittatas are made from leftover roasted veggies.  So, if you want a slammin’ frittata for Sunday brunch, roast some veggies for dinner one night this week and save back some extras.

Roasted Vegetables

Chop red onion, red bell pepper, sweet potato, carrots, and any other veggies you particularly like into chunks.

Place veggies in a bowl, drizzle with oil, and salt, pepper, maybe some red pepper flakes, and roast at 375 for 30-40 minutes, until fork-tender.

If you don’t have leftover roasted vegetables, how about leftover asparagus?  broccoli?  potatoes?  steak and peppers?  (yum) Just see what is in your fridge and get creative.

Leftovers Frittata

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In this frittata I added chopped baby spinach in with my goat cheese. It’s good to hide vegetables whenever you can.

Here’s what you need:

5-6 eggs

Splash of milk

Goat cheese (or cheese of choice — but goat cheese is the best cheese)

Leftovers (or other fillings of choice)

Here’s what you do:

Preheat the oven to 425 and grab a nonstick skillet that can go into the oven (most can).

Chop your veggies into smaller bits.

Heat a little oil in your skillet and warm it over medium heat.

Throw in your leftover veggies to warm, approximately 1-2 minutes.

In a separate bowl, break your eggs, pour in your milk, and stir together.  You can use a whisk if you want to but I use a fork.

Shake in the same amount of salt and pepper you would use for 6 scrambled eggs.  I shake twice per egg and count in my head — so 10-12 shakes for a 6-egg frittata.  (Is this a completely obsessive thing to share, or is this accurate blogging?  You can decide.)

Pour the eggs over the veggies and let it cook for a few minutes on the stove top.  After 2-3 minutes, you’ll begin to see the edges forming a shape.  At this point, sprinkle on your goat cheese.

Pop your frittata skillet into the oven and bake until firm and golden, about 12 minutes.  I usually set the timer for 12 minutes and sometimes let it go up to 15.  If your skillet is larger, your frittata will cook faster so be aware and watch your time the first time.

Want to make a frittata but not out of leftovers?  Here’s a few other frittata recipes you can try:

Are you a frittata lover?  Any favorite flavor combinations?

This post is number 30 of my #write31days project 31 Days in the Pink-Briefcase Kitchen. You can follow along with the series each day in October. An archive of posts is available here, or just click on that big button on the right sidebar.

Leftovers Frittata
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  • Oh, oh! Please do a cocktails series! A frittata is definitely a great way to use up leftovers! What’s the weirdest ingredient you’ve ever tried in one? Oh, and where do you get your goat cheese?

    • We just go to trader joes. They have lots of flavors, but I’m wondering now if you have a secret source?!

      I’m thinking we haven’t put anything too weird — maybe leftover Brussels sprouts and bacon?

      • I don’t think I have a secret source, though I do have a farm I get dairy and eggs from; I’ve never ordered their cheese because of the price. Trader Joe’s is usually reasonable, so I’ll have to go check them out. Thanks!

  • Sounds like you have some great content that still needs to be shared! A holiday series, maybe? I’d love to hear more about the cocktails, too.

  • I haven’t made many frittatas but I do like them!

  • Teresa Tackett Hardymon

    Yummy! Please do continue all the food talk after the 31 days!

  • Jennifer Bowler

    That frittata looks so good. I love goat cheese

    • Me too! Did you see the goat cheese guest post from earlier this week? I can’t stop thinking about it now.

  • Nikki Ringenberg

    I love my cast iron skillet for frittatas. I’m trying to think what we put in our last one, ham and…no idea, some vegetables I’m sure, yet pair them with pork, egg, and cheese, and my husband eats them without complaint, even the leftovers!

  • Hey, I tried this tonight! It turned out great. I also learned that I don’t like goat cheese. But it would be great with cheddar. (Sorry I’m such a gourmet loser.) 🙂

    • Really?!?! That is so surprising to me — but also totally fine. To each her own.

  • Pingback: Marge Burkell – Frittata Recipes – Low Carb Scrumptious!()

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