Five [Awesome] Things I Read This Week, May 10th Edition

It’s been a while, my friends.  It’s good to see you again. 

Five Awesome Things I Read This Week copy

Todd Hendrickson’s My Client Will Die:

“You screwed up. Man up. Admit you made a catastrophic mistake. Pay up and let my client try to enjoy the remaining time he has until the cancer literally squeeze the life out f him. Pay up and let him travel or spend time with his grandchildren or experience something he’s always wanted to do.  Pay up and let him enjoy his remaining time rather than waste even one of his dwindling days in mediation or in trial.”

David Marshall’s A Defense of Studying Literature:

“Of course the world needs scientists and mathematicians, and, because rigor probably has scared people away, it’s important to urge others to fill those roles. But we also need brilliant people who can accommodate soft thinking and appreciate elusiveness and uncertainty and—dare I say it?—beauty.”

Jenny Lawson’s Rules for Life:

“10. Don’t use the word “literally” when you really mean “figuratively”.  It literally makes me want to stab you a little but I don’t do it because that’s illegal and also because I have a very limited amount of knives.

11. Read more.  Watch shows that inspire you.  Embrace whatever makes you geek out.  Even if it’s Laura Ingalls.  Because Laura Ingalls is fascinating and there’s nothing wrong with obsessively knowing every detail about her life and death.  Stop judging me.”

(emphasis mine.  I LOVE LAURA INGALLS WILDER WITH A FIREY PASSION SURPASSED ONLY BY MY LOVE FOR CANNONS AND PIRATES.)

Ashleigh Baker’s Simple Stories [an invitation to old-fashioned blogging]

“But we’ve become stuck, silenced by our own fear and the pressing expectations to create stellar shareable content, to catch eyes and make it all mean something. When did blogging start taking itself so seriously? Nobody has life-changing thoughts every day.”

Allie Brosh at Hyperbole and a Half’s Depression Part Two:

“However, I could no longer rely on genuine emotion to generate facial expressions, and when you have to spend every social interaction consciously manipulating your face into shapes that are only approximately the right ones, alienating people is inevitable.

. . . Everyone noticed.”

 

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